Canada  aircraft

The Canadair CL-66 was a Canadian development, for
Trans-Canada Airlines(TCA), of

the Douglas DC-4

 

Canadair North Star CL-5

Design and development

Canadair Aircraft Ltd. took over the Canadian Vickers Ltd. operations on 11 November 1944. Besides the existing Consolidated PBY Canso flying patrol boats in production, a development contract to produce a new variant of the Douglas DC-4 transport was still in effect. The new Canadair DC-4M powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin engines mounted in Rolls-Royce Universal Power Plant (UPP) installations[4] emerged in 1946 as the "North Star." More than just an engine swap, the North Star had the Douglas DC-6 nose, landing gear and fuselage shortened by 80 in (2 metres), DC-4 empennage, rear fuselage, flaps and wing tips, C-54 middle fuselage sections, wing centre- and outer-wing panels, cabin pressurisation, a standardised cockpit layout and a different electrical system.

 

 

Canadair built 71 examples under the designations: North Star, DC-4M, C-4 and C-5. With the exception of the single C-5 (which had Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines, as fitted to the Douglas DC-6), these variants were all powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and 51 of the production examples were pressurised.

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You are definitely intrigued to discover DC-4-M North Star.

Canadair built 71 examples under the designations: North Star, DC-4M, C-4 and C-5. With the exception of the single C-5 (which had Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines, as fitted to the Douglas DC-6), these variants were all powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and 51 of the production examples were pressurised.

DC-4M.1

Initial variant as designed for Trans Canada Airlines (TCA); at least 5 built for TCA.

DC-4M.2

Canadair
Canadair North Star

The RCAF North Stars were unpressurized and were used on a variety of transport duties. Like other North Stars, they were notorious for the high level of cabin noise caused by the Merlin engines, as unlike the radials of the DC-4, the exhaust from the individual cylinders is not collected and exhausted via a single outlet, but instead exits the separate individual ejector-exhaust stubs in high-pressure bursts.

Canadair DC-4-M North Star: See below

  • History

    Role Passenger and cargo transport

    Manufacturer Canadair

    First flight 15 July 1946

    Introduction 1946

    Retired 1960s (RCAF), 1975 (last civil operator)

  • General Info

    Primary users Trans-Canada Air Lines

    Royal Canadian Air Force

    Canadian Pacific Air Lines

    BOAC

    Flying Enterprise

    Produced 1946 - 1950

    Number built 71

    Developed from Douglas DC-4

  • Performance

    Crew: Seven

    Capacity: 52 First Class passengers, or 62 if operated as an all-Economy Class aircraft or 11,500 lbs (5,216 kg) of cargo

    Length: 94 ft 9½ in (28.89 m)

    Wingspan: 117 ft 6 in (35.81 m)

    Height: 27 ft 6 in (8.38 m) Performance

    Maximum speed: 307 knots (353 mph, 568 km/h)

    Cruise speed: 282 knots (325 mph, 523 km/h) Range: . (6 212 km.)

    Service ceiling: 36,000 ft (10,970 m)

Canadair North Star CL-5

Aircrafttotaal

The Canadair North Star was a 1940s Canadian development, for Trans-Canada Air Lines (TCA), of the Douglas DC-4.instead of radial piston engines used by the Douglas design, Canadair used Rolls-Royce Merlin V12 engines to achieve a higher cruising speed of 325 mph (523 km/h) compared with the 227 mph (365 km/h) of the standard DC-4.

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