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The Bombardier Challenger 600 series is a family of business jets. It was first produced by Canadair as an independent company .

 

Canadair CC-144 Challenger

Design and development

The Bombardier Challenger 600 series is a family of business jets. It was first produced by Canadair as an independent company and then produced from 1986 by Canadair as a division of Bombardier Aerospace. As of December 2017, close to 1,100 Challenger 600 Series have been delivered. Including the Challenger 300 and Challenger 850, the 1,600 Bombardier Challengers in-service had logged 7.3 million hours over 4.3 million flights in early 2017. The origin of the Challenger 600 lies in Canadair’s purchase of a concept for a business jet aircraft, the LearStar 600 from the American inventor and aircraft developer Bill Lear. However, Lear had practically no influence on the ensuing development and design of the aircraft. Even the name LearStar was not new to this concept, since Lear had long before used the name for his conversion of Lockheed Lodestars into business transports. Thus, Canadair  quickly abandoned the name LearStar and adopted the name Challenger.

Challengers can be identified visually by their distinctive double slotted hinged flap design, where the fairings can be seen below the wings, a sight much more common on commercial airliners.

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Canadair CC-144

12 aircraft purchased by the Royal Canadian Air Force, including the CE-144 and CX-144

Canadair CE-144

Three Electronic warfare / EW trainers converted to/from basic CC-144.
Canadair CX-144

Second prototype, a CL-600-1A11, c/n 1002, allocated to the RCAF after finishing test programme. Used at the Aerospace Engineering and Test Establishment (AETE), CFB Cold Lake until retirement in 1993, now preserved at the CFB Winnipeg. Designated CC-144 in service.

Canadair
Canadair CC-144 Challenger

On 8 November 1978, the prototype aircraft took off at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The second and third prototypes flew in 1979. A test flight on 3 April 1980 in the Mojave Desert resulted in disaster, the aircraft crashing due to the failure of the release mechanism to detach the recovery chute after a deep stall, killing one of the test pilots (the other test pilot and the flight test engineer parachuted to safety).

Canadair CC-144 Challenger: See below

  • History

    Role Business jet

    Manufacturer Bombardier Aerospace

    First flight 8 November 1978

    Status Active In production

    Produced 1978–present

    Number built nearly 1100 (Dec 2017)

    Unit cost

    650: US$32.35 millionUS (2015)

    Developed into CRJ-100/200

  • General Info

    Crew: Two (pilot & co-pilot)

    Capacity: Up to 12 passengers

    Payload: 2,200 kg (4,850 lb)

    Length: 20.9 m (68 ft 5 in)

    Wingspan: 19.6 m (64 ft 4 in)

    Height: 6.3 m (20 ft 8 in)
    Cabin: 1.83 m / 6 ft 0 in high, 2.41 m / 7 ft 11 in wide

    Powerplant: 2 × General Electric CF34-3B turbofans, 41 kN (9,220 lbf) each

  • Performance

    Maximum speed: Mach 0.85 (490 kn; 908 km/h)

    Cruise speed: Mach 0.80 (461 kn; 854 km/h)

    Range: 7,408 km (4,000 nm)

    Service ceiling: 12,497 m (41,000 ft)
    Takeoff: 1,720 m / 5,640 ft (SL, ISA, MTOW)

    Landing: 732 m / 2,402 ft (SL, ISA, typical)

Canadair CC-144 Challenger

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The Bombardier Challenger 600 series is a family of business jets. It was first produced by Canadair as an independent company and then produced from 1986 by Canadair as a division of Bombardier Aerospace.

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