Canada  aircraft

The Canadair CL-44 was a Canadian turboprop airliner and cargo aircraft based on the Bristol Britannia.

 

Canadair CL-44 Yukon

Design and development

n the 1950s, Canadair had acquired a licence to build the Bristol Britannia airliner. Their first use of the licence was to build the heavily modified Canadair CL-28 Argus patrol aircraft (RCAF designation CP-107) that combined the Britannia's wings and tail sections with a new fuselage and engines. The resulting aircraft had lower speed and altitude, but had two bomb bays and greatly extended loiter times.

Loading a Canadair CL-44 at Manchester in 1963 with the fuselage swung open. This aircraft was operated by BOAC on charter from Seaboard World Airlines

With an RCAF requirement for a replacement for its C-54GM North Star (an extensive redesign of the Douglas C-54 Skymaster, that among many changes, was powered by Merlin engines) fleets, Canadair began work on a long range transport primarily intended to provide personnel and logistics support for Canadian Forces in Europe. In January 1957 Canadair received a contract for eight aircraft, later increased to 12. The RCAF designation for the new design was the CC-106 Yukon, while the company's civilian variant was known as the CL-44-6. In company parlance the CL-44 was simply "the Forty-Four."

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On the cargo aircraft variant CL-44D4 the entire tail section hinged. It could be opened using hydraulic actuators to load large items quickly. An inflatable seal at the hinge-break enabled cabin pressure to be maintained, and eight hydraulic-operated locks assured structural integrity. The tail could be opened from controls within the tail in 90 seconds. The flight controls at the joint were maintained by a system of push pads.
The CL-44D4 was the first large aircraft to be able to "swing" its tail, although some small naval aircraft had this feature to ease storage. These, however, required rigging before flight. There were only four original customers who bought and operated the CL-44D4.

Canadair
Canadair CL-44 Yukon

The CL-44D4 was the first large aircraft to be able to "swing" its tail, although some small naval aircraft had this feature to ease storage. These, however, required rigging before flight. There were only four original customers who bought and operated the CL-44D4.

 

Canadair CL-44 Yukon: See below

  • History

    Role Military transport aircraft

    Cargo aircraft

    Manufacturer Canadair

    First flight 16 November 1959

    Introduction 19 July 1960 (RCAF)

    Retired 1971 (RCAF) Number built 39

    Developed from Bristol Britannia

    Variants Conroy Skymonster

  • General Info

    Crew: 3 (4 including loadmaster)

    Length: 136 ft 11 in (41.73 m)

    Wingspan: 142 ft 4 in (43.37 m)

    Height: 36 ft 8 in (11.18 m)

    Empty weight: 88,952 lb (40,348 kg)

    Useful load: 66,048 lb (29,959 kg)
    Powerplant: 4 × Rolls-Royce Tyne 515/50 turboprops, 5,730 shp (4,270 kW) each

  • Performance

    Maximum speed: 670 km/h

    Cruise speed: 349 knots (402 mph, 646 km/h)

    Range: 4,855 nm (5,588 mi, 8,990 km)

    Service ceiling: 30,000 ft (9,100 m)

     

Canadair CL-44/CC-106 Yukon

Aircrafttotaal

The Canadair North Star was a 1940s Canadian development, for Trans-Canada Air Lines (TCA), of the Douglas DC-4.instead of radial piston engines used by the Douglas design, Canadair used Rolls-Royce Merlin V12 engines to achieve a higher cruising speed of 325 mph (523 km/h) compared with the 227 mph (365 km/h) of the standard DC-4.

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